This and that

With writing the instapoems and the memoir, I need something in which to take notes. So I have a variety of notebooks.

One of these, the little leather-bound Filofax, is small enough to go in a jacket or trouser pocket. When I started carrying it around regularly, I realised it contained a mixture of different notes, including those from medical consultations as well as my literary thoughts. So I finally got myself together to transfer the medical notes to a bigger Filofax. This holds many more pages than the little one, but is too big to haul around every day. (I would just leave it somewhere if I did.)

The small Filofax still has a range of stuff in it: memoir notes, instapoems, general thoughts and reflections, and possible thesis topics. I hit on the idea of sticking a different coloured tag on each of these categories. When I want to tidy things up, the Filofax format will allow me to put each of these things together. (Eventually, I will get some tabs and another notes insert; I will do this when in town on Monday.) At present, though, they are all mixed in. The colour coding saves me from looking through the whole notebook each time I want to find something.

Among my blessings is that I am not having any pain or other effects from the cancer. One thing I am experiencing, however, is what people call cancer brain. (There is a nice little paper about it here ; the author calls it “cancer brain fog”.) I am, at times, very scatty: starting things and forgetting them, then coming back in and being reminded of them. That kind of thing. The paper I linked to above gives some good strategies. All the usual suspects get a guernsey; exercise, mindfulness practice, creating visual reminders of tasks to be completed, a balanced diet, sleep. (I’ve been working on the last one for about twenty years!)

With the instapoems, I have been naming them after elements. Primo Levi’s wonderful book The periodic table attempts to characterise those elements he describes. In my case, however, there is no symbolism involved. It’s simply that the periodic table is a useful source of names. (I don’t think I will use boron, though, lest it describe the effect of that poem on the reader.)

The story of how the periodic table was developed is one worth reading. There is a very approachable book for scientific illiterates like me, The disappearing spoon: and other true tales of madness, love, and the history of the world from the periodic table of the elements, by Sam Kean. I found and, on the second go, printed out a one-page copy of the periodic table, so that I won’t double up on poem titles.

The poem which mentions Min Kym was inspired by her memoir Gone: a girl, a violin, a life unstrung . There is a synopsis here . Recommended. (All these links, except the last one, point to records in my local public library.)

5 thoughts on “This and that

  1. Re boron: I was delighted when studying undergraduate psychology, the Gate Control Theory of Pain, as I recall, that one of the major researchers in the field had the surname Boring; he seemed to have married a colleague, so many of the key papers were by Boring and Boring. You couldn’t make it up. J xxx

    Sent from my iPad

    >

    Like

  2. Interesting that hardcopy is sometimes easier than electronic record keeping – I am finding that myself and have felt the pull now to return to paper. Instead I work halfway in between and as a result can’t find anything!

    Like

    1. Hi Georgia! I have found a good substitute for the Filofax. It is made by Midori and is called the Traveler’s Notebook. Here is a link to their range: https://www.bookbindersonline.com.au/collections/travelers-notebook . This link points to a Brisbane store, but there is an outlet in Emporium that sells this range; see https://milligram.com/midori . Maybe we could have a sandwich on one of your town days & I could show you? (I have been meaning to go in there and ask them a question about putting a third notebook into my cover.)

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s